Friday, 15 May 2015

Performance Lecture by Tisna Sanjaya | "There are too many episodes of people coming here..." [projects 2008 - 2014]


Date: 28 May, Thursday 
Time: 7 - 9pm 
Venue: NUS Museum
Register:
episodes.peatix.com



Programme
7 - 7.15pm: Curatorial introduction to "There are too many episodes of people coming here..." [projects 2008 - 2014]
7.15 - 8pm: Performance-Lecture by Tisna Sanjaya
8 - 8.30pm: Exhibition Tour
8.30pm: Reception

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On occasion of the exhibition, “There are too many episodes of people coming here…” [projects 2008 – 2014], Indonesian artist Tisna Sanjaya will be conducting a performance-lecture that revisits his 2011 exhibition presented at the Museum, Cigondewah: An art project by Tisna Sanjaya. As a project that began in 2007 and attempted to articulate a post-auratic positioning of art and artist within a communitarian framework of purpose and agency, the performance-lecture will evaluate and prospect evolving strategies, and the complex complicities that necessarily link between advocacy, the exhibitionary and publics, within and beyond Cigondewah. A publication on Tisna’s project Cigondewah will also be launched during the occasion of the lecture.

The Cigondewah exhibition of 2011 is one of several projects re-presented in “… too many episodes …”. An exhibition about exhibitions, it brings together a group of artworks, artefacts, and documentations drawn from projects organised by the NUS Museum between the years 2008 to 2014. Together, they can be considered highlights of recent curatorial projects; but importantly, they are assembled to prompt considerations into ways of working, and the broader relationships between objects, subjects, and authorial control or the lack of it. Many of these projects were also devised along encounters that drift between discipline and heuristic impulses, and as such render readings or positions dependent on negotiations and play.

The exhibition title is based on the words of Wak Ali, a custodian of a Muslim shrine that once stood on the banks of the Kallang River. It is at once an affirmation and a lament about the potentials of a site that may transform the individual regard, and the very contingency of positions on immediate experiences and commitments. An exhibition can only harbour meanings that are provisional and conditional, if it is to be an active site for a public with an active agency. Is this our purpose? If so, what of institutional methods and practice?

About the artist
A socially-engaged artist, Tisna uses a wide range of techniques and medium available (drawing, etching, aquatint, mixed media, installation and performance art) to raise awareness of the human, social and political conditions in Indonesia, though often done so with a characteristic humour. He has exhibited widely both in Europe and Asia, and was most recently included as part of the exhibition Secret Archipelago at the Palais de Tokyo in March 2015.

Exhibition runs till August 2015.

Malaya Black & White | World for Ransom


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Following a well-established Hollywood tradition of 'setting' films in an imaginary version of Singapore, World For Ransom, directed by the fledgling auteur Robert Aldrich, is arguably the best of the lot. Aldrich conjures his ersatz Lion City from leftover sets, props and actors from the z-budget TV series 'China Smith' (also set in 'Singapore'). The plot is a hybrid of pitch-dark film noir and atomic-era espionage hokum (anticipating the spy flicks of the '60s), casting its Oriental-Tropical city as a zone of criminality and perversity. The great Dan Duryea plays one of the saddest, most abused anti-heros in all of noir, a 'good' man whose sacrifices and compromised personal ethics point towards Jack Flowers and Saint Jack.

This screening is part of the 'Beyond Saint Jack' segment under the NUS Museum's Malaya Black & White film series.

About ‘Beyond Saint Jack’ - The strange cinematic visitors of Singapore and Malaya
Singapore/Malaya’s heyday of foreign production from the mid 1960s to the early 1980s led to a motley filmography of B-movies, commercial disasters, miscellaneous TV episodes, lost films and bizarre curios. While they resist canonisation, these films are a fascinating portal into how the region was perceived by the rest of the world both before and after the end of the colonial era; and the eagerness for Singapore and Malaysia to be represented and acknowledged by the West. A recurring motif of their narratives is the Western visitor in Singapore. This season of 10 films showcases the predecessors and descendants of Saint Jack (1979): old hands, good men, legal aliens, rugged individualists, ex-soldiers, detectives, has-beens and rock stars. Characters who have found themselves ensnared in traps beyond their control, stumbled across exotic, bewildering cultures, or entered zones of erotic possibility.

Beyond Saint Jack is guest-curated by author and critic Ben Slater, who will be present to introduce and discuss each film.

About Ben Slater
Ben Slater is the author of Kinda Hot: The Making of Saint Jack in Singapore (2006), a major contributor to World Film Locations: Singapore(2014) and the editor of 25: Histories and Memories of the Singapore International Film Festival (2014). He’s also the co-screenwriter of the feature film Camera (2014) and a Lecturer at the School of Art, Media and Design, Nanyang Technological University.

To find out more about the Malaya Black & White project, please go tohttps://malayablackandwhite.wordpress.com/

Thursday, 14 May 2015

Children's Season 2015 | Conserving Our Heritage

Portrait of a Baby, Oil on Canvas - After Conservation. Image © Beneka Art Conservation
Dates: Saturday, 13 and 20 June 2015 (Repeat Session)
Timing: 10.30am – 12.30pm
Age Group: 9 years – 14 years
Require a minimum of 9 pairs of parents and children to conduct workshop. 

Register: http://conservationforkids.peatix.com/
For enquiries, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516-8817 / 4616.
*1 ticket admits 1 parent and child pair.

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Join us for a Heritage Conservation Workshop this June holidays to learn more about the importance of heritage, who looks after it and why we must protect it. Families will also learn more about how museums and art galleries look after their artefacts, which may be affected by light, temperature, humidity and object handling. Each parent-child team will also receive hands-on experience in applying conservation techniques to conserve artefacts!

About the Conservator
Conservator Jayashree Bhat has called Singapore her home for more than 10 years and has over a decade of experience in conserving artworks. She graduated with a BA in Fine Arts from the University of Mysore. In 2006, Jayashree co-founded the Benaka Art Conservation Studio which specialises in conservation and restoration of paintings and artworks on paper. She has published several articles, given talks and conducted workshops on curative & preventive conservation and tropical atmosphere and its impact on delicate artworks.

Children’s Season 2015 is jointly presented by National Heritage Board and Museum Roundtable.

Wednesday, 13 May 2015

Children's Season 2015 | Chinese Calligraphy and Ink Painting Workshop

Image © Chang Studio
Dates: Saturdays, 6 & 13 June 2015 and 20 & 27 June 2015 (Repeat Session)
Timing: 2pm – 4.30pm
Age Group: 7 years – 12 years
Require a minimum of 12 pairs of parents and children to conduct workshop. 

Register: calligraphyforkids.peatix.com
For enquiries, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516-8817 / 4616.
*1 ticket admits 1 parent and child pair.



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Sign up for our Chinese Calligraphy and Ink Painting Workshops this June to explore more about these traditional Chinese art forms. During the first session, parents and children will be introduced to the history of Chinese calligraphy before learning basic brush techniques and simple characters.
In the next session, you will discover how to paint traditional subjects such as bamboo, trees, flowers, and birds amongst others. At the end of the workshop, each team gets to bring home their own unique work!

About the Artist
Chang Studio was established in 2001 and seeks to inculcate traditional Chinese culture in the hearts of our society, especially that of the younger generation. It has been providing art education to Singapore schools. Their artist-teachers specializes in art forms such as Chinese Calligraphy, Chinese Brush Painting, Paper Cutting, Seal Carving and Ceramics which are endorsed by the National Arts Council of Singapore. These courses are designed to provide young learners with a basic foundation and technical skills to expand their horizons and creativity.


Children’s Season 2015 is jointly presented by National Heritage Board and Museum Roundtable.

Monday, 4 May 2015

CultureHackSG 1.0 | Confessions of a Jiak Kantang Cook

Jiak Kantang: to eat potatoes; a Chinese person who eats the Western staple of potatoes instead of the very Chinese bowl of rice. A figure of speech to describe a Westernised Chinese.
  
Although to be accurate, it is not only rice that has been replaced by my proverbial potatoes, but chap chye, ayam buahkuas, and bee hoon. This is Singapore, and I am Peranakan Chinese. The only time I eat a spread of Peranakan food is during Chinese New Year. And I never cook it at home.
If you were born in the late 80s and early 90s, my guess is you, too, are a jiak kantang cook. You learnt your first dishes with The Naked Chef, and perfected your repertoire with Nigella and Gordon. You can pull off a modern British dinner with ease and aplomb. You have a wide range of one-dish wonders that pop out of the oven in an hour. You are familiar with ingredients that grow in the aisles of a specialty supermarket, like truffle oil and pink Himalayan salt. But langkuas? Serai?

So you can imagine the questions in my head when I received the Jiak Masak Masak mystery box for CultureHack 1.0, held at the NUS Baba House during Singapore Art Week. The recipes were from two colonial ma├ím’s cookbooks, written in the 1930s to ease their culinary adventures in the exotic but often distressing Malayas. But I found that unpacking the recipe was as confusing as if I was a new expat in Singapore.

I conquered the Fish Moolie in the end, but not without taking notes for future jiak kantang cooks who are up for a new project. I present to you:
Steps to Hacking a Fish Moolie:

1. Ask Google the obvious question, “What is a moolie?” It will quickly tell you it is a coconut curry that does not involve curry powder.

2. Ask Google more questions, such as “What is serai?”and “Is saffron tumeric?” If you feel vaguely defeated at NTUC with nothing concrete from Google, head to Local Ingredient Mecca for expert help: Tekka Market.




 

3. Tell an expert Tekka auntie what you want, and watch her pack it all swiftly into a bag for you. Easy peasy. Stare unabashedly at all things wild and wonderful in the vegetable aisles. Think of yourself as a modern female Ali Baba navigating treasure caves.

4. Hunt down saffron. Find an Indian man who stands behind hills of golden spices. Do not be fooled, none of the vivid piles of spices are saffron. He will give you a tiny clear plastic box, no bigger than TicTacs. Inside it lies a cluster of delicate strands. Be delighted.

5. Discover a week later that Mustafa’s supermarket has an entire section dedicated to saffron. Prefer your rugged discovery journey anyway.

6. Start assembling the ingredients. Use a stainless knife, or your cute blue knife will turn irreversibly orange from the yellow ginger.

7. Serai (lemongrass) is to be cut from the base; the tips have much less fragrance. Use a few inches of it, sliced thinly.

8. Langkuas (a kind of ginger) is to be cut from the fat roots, not the narrow shoots. A few slices will do.

9. Saffron, though red, turns everything yellow when crushed. Use sparingly, because it is costly.

10. Pound all ingredients together with a pestle and mortar if you want to feel extra Heritage.

11. Fry dry ingredients, pour coconut milk in to make a broth, and add fish. Realize that colonial tastebuds are used to a lot less flavour. Increase quantities of ingredients until your eyes pop open at how yummy it suddenly becomes.
12. Fry firm fish fillets separately. Unless you are loaded, do not buy Kurau. I repeat, do not buy kurau.

13. As a tribute to your Jamie Oliver roots, think of ways to maximise your hard labour by hacking the Moolie into a pasta meal. Surprisingly, the moolie adapts well as a creamy sauce for linguine. Ignore the laughter, they will understand when they try it. Just make sure you have enough sauce to coat all the pasta. Not for the calorie conscious.

Julienne Tan is an illustrator, graphic designer and small-quantity food enthusiast. She writes about her art and design (occasionally) at www.julienne-tan.com.



Me at the end of the buffet line, dishing out Fish Moolie Linguine.

CultureHackSG 1.0 | Jemput Masak! What Can We Learn through Food and Cooking!

by Devisanthi Tunas

When our friends, the dynamic duo Mizah and Jan of Participate In Design (PiD), invited us to participate in a workshop called Jemput Masak! (Come and Cook) that they were organising together with Post Museum and NUS Baba House as a part of CultureHackSG1.0, it didn’t take long for me and my twin sister to say yes. Being foodies, avid cooks and history buffs of sorts too, we found the idea of trying a recipe from a 1930s cookbook written for Europeans in Malaya very intriguing. To top it off, the idea that we would be preparing, presenting and sharing a dish in the beautifully restored NUS Baba House was something that we could not miss. 

NUS Baba House kitchen. Whilst we didn't prepare the dish in the actual kitchen, Jemput Masak presented us with an opportunity that is as close as you can get to such experience
(Image credit: Devisanthi Tunas)
The participants of the Jemput Masak workshop consisted of several people. These people were then divided into groups of two though some decided to take on the challenge on their own. Each group received a mystery tool kit that was presented in a nicely designed box. In the box, we found a recipe of a dish that we were to adapt and reinvent. With the recipe, some tools and ingredients were placed together with some stipend. There were altogether six mystery toolkits with each containing different recipes. Later, we found out that the six recipes to be tackled included two appetisers: duck soup with fresh lotus seeds or sin lin ap tong and otak-otak ; two main dish: fish moulee and Straits Chinese chicken satay; and two type of desserts: kueh bangkit and cream of Malaya pudding.

To our delight our mystery box contained the recipe of Straits Chinese chicken satay and a bundle of bamboo satay sticks. This dish is rather familiar to us and something that we have made before; in fact we had been known to sell some chicken satay to earn extra pocket money in our salad days as students in Europe. Some participants though had to try something that was completely new and foreign to them. Two lovely ladies had to each tackle cream of Malaya pudding and fish moulee. One seasoned baker in the group had to tackle kueh bangkit which she exclaimed as complicated.

Our mystery box with chicken satay recipe and a bundle of satay sticks
(Image credit: PiD)
We were given a week from the day we received the mystery box until the day of the presentation to study the recipe and do everything necessary to prepare the dish which was to be shared with a number of guests and fellow participants. Reading through our chicken satay recipe, we quickly learned that the recipe would yield a different kind of satay from what we commonly find today in Singapore. A heavily spiced satay it would not be; although the recipe calls for coriander powder and cumin (listed as jinten puteh), it is missing other significant ingredients such as tumeric, galangal and ginger that would normally be used to create Singapore style satay.

Interestingly, we found two peculiar ingredients in the recipe, namely Chinese sauce vinegar and boiled chicken. We tried to figure out some sort of reasoning behind such inclusions. For the boiled chicken, we reckoned that as refrigerator would have been a rare luxury in the 30s, a more accessible way to preserve meat was to pre-cook it thus the recipe calls for a boiled chicken instead of raw ones. As for Chinese sauce vinegar, could it be that the recipe writer confused it with sweet soya sauce which is commonly used in satay recipe and whose dark color is not unlike Chinese vinegar? Or maybe it was deliberately included to suit European taste buds that generally dislike sweet cloying tastes in their savoury food?

Putting aside the fact that it calls for boiled chicken and the possible confusion about soya sauce, we think the recipe actually could yield satay that is somehow similar to Indonesian style satay particularly the Javanese kind. Furthermore, cumin and coriander powder are also commonly added in Javanese satay recipes. Born in Bandung and growing up in Jakarta, we grew up with this kind of satay which Singaporeans would dismiss as bland but probably tastes closer to the Straits Chinese satay. It is interesting that we learnt now from the recipe book that in the 30s, the Chinese in the Straits settlements were probably familiar with a less spicy kind of satay different from what people often refer to as the Malay style satay that we know today in Singapore and Malaysia.

After some consideration, eventually we decided to reinvent the recipe. Boiled chicken was replaced with raw chicken as we both agreed that it would give better flavour and texture to the satay. Chicken thigh fillet was chosen as it has a good portion of fat that would make our satay juicy. We also replaced Chinese sauce vinegar with sweet soya sauce as we wanted our satay to taste sweetish not sour.  As for the flavoring, we added the cumin and coriander powder as listed in the old recipe. We were happy with the end result and it appeared that the satay was rather well received during the tasting session at the NUS Baba House. The big winner of the night though was the delicious duck soup made by a mother-daughter team which was prepared by following the old recipe strictly.

Guests and participants having a taste of our chicken satay
(Image credit: NUS Baba House)
We enjoyed the whole experience with Jemput Masak thoroughly. It was a fantastic opportunity to meet new people whom we got to know better over our fire making and satay grilling session at the back alley of NUS Baba House. As we were chatting about our dishes we exchanged some tips and stories too about our cooking habits. We learnt about what other participants would do to our recipe if they were in our shoes and vice versa.  What people eat and how they prepare their food evolves through time along with changing societal concerns and technology advances. Cultural backgrounds and personal preferences would bring a different twist to certain dishs, creating unique hybridity.  Sometimes we can learn so much about a society through their ways of eating and cooking. And that is sometimes the most fascinating way of doing it. 

Devisanthi Tunas is a Singapore-based designer and architect. She runs GreenAsiaForce.com   It is an informative website that seeks to raise awareness on sustainable practices in building & urban design and lifestyle in general. She has called Singapore home for the last 14 years.

Friday, 24 April 2015

Public Sculptures by Delia Prvacki | Poetry, Dance, Day in the City, Music, Night


Delia Prvacki, Dance, 2000
Stoneware, stains, oxides and gold
NUS Museum Collection, Gift of Fairmont Singapore
Installed at the NUS Museum in 2015 as a gift from Fairmont Singapore, the set of five sculptures by artist Delia Prvacki, Poetry, Dance, Day in the City, Music,and Night, was commissioned when the hotel was still known as Raffles The Plaza. Installed in 2000, they were produced for the recesses in the wall behind the hotel’s reception desks. In 2013, a change in the hotel’s interior design was planned and with the new concept, a congruent placement for the artworks could not be found. The management of Fairmont Singapore contacted the artist, Delia Prvacki, to discuss options for redeploying the sculptures. Delia proposed making a donation of the artworks to NUS Museum, a suggestion which was favourably considered by the hotel management.

Sculptures displayed in the lobby at Fairmont Singapore (formerly Raffles The Plaza)
Photo courtesy of Delia Prvacki
The sculptural grouping embodies layers of ideas and inspiration. When Delia was invited to submit a proposal for the commission in 2000, the hotel’s ambience provided the starting point for her artistic formulation. The diversity of human encounters taking place around the clock in such establishments captivated her senses, particularly the dynamic space of the lobby where lively conversational exchanges, laughter, music and footsteps melded into a lyrical soundscape. The sculptures  were conceived as an integrated composition articulating life in this cosmopolitan setting.

Delia Prvacki, Music, 2000
Stoneware, stains, oxides and gold
NUS Museum Collection, Gift of Fairmont Singapore
The hotel lobby of Raffles The Plaza sported a predominantly brownish colour scheme and in keeping with the aesthetic intent of the interior, the artist left the ceramic sculptures largely unglazed to retain the natural hues of clay. ‘In public artworks, the pieces I make are conceptually and visually coherent with the space. It allows people to relate better to the surroundings’ explains Delia. 

Delia Prvacki, Clockwise: Poetry, Day in the City, Music, Night
2000, Stoneware, stains, oxides and gold
NUS Museum Collection, Gift of Fairmont Singapore
The sinuous lines on Dance capture the graceful movements of this art form while the motifs and colour of Music reference the fluid designs on the body of blue and white Chinese ceramic wares. Poetry which takes the form of a blade of grass arching from the wind is Delia’s response to Leaves of Grass, a book of poems by American Walt Whitman. A botanical species that endures despite environmental upheavals, a blade of grass is a signifier of the resilience of life. Broad at its base and gently curving and tapering towards a pointed tip, the motif is also presented on Odyssey, a mural installed at the NUS University Hall in 2005. Among the five sculptures, only Poetry has its principal surface fully glazed to allow for swashes of gold to be applied over the body.

A preliminary study of the support structure holding sections of the sculpture
 
Installation, 8 April 2015
The artworks are designed and constructed in a modular form. Each sculpture comprises between four to six sections which are assembled on top of one another. As they were scheduled for installation only when furnishing works in the hotel lobby had been completed, the artist conceived of this modular design to alleviate the need for heavy mechanical hoisting aids and scaffolds. Each section was made in a size which could be lifted by hand and positioned into the niches of the lobby wall. Co-incidentally, this construction also simplified the task of transporting the artworks when they were being relocated to NUS. 

Alice Lee Plaza, NUS Museum
Installing the sculptures at NUS brought together curatorial, conservation, engineering and estate management expertise. Selection of a new site took into account the original artistic intention for the works to be lined in a specific sequence and viewed frontally. A fitting spot was identified in the NUS Alice Lee Plaza, at the water feature across the entrance from NUS Museum. Careful consideration was given to the stability of the artworks and the safety of individuals who would be in close proximity to them. The support configuration consists of a heavy base with a spine which prevents the sections of the sculpture from being accidental dislodged. For each support structure, the height of the spine, its angle of tilt and the positioning on the base are customized according to the internal construction of the artwork. 

(Written by: Foo Su Ling)

Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Malaya Black & White | The 7th Dawn


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A curious and fascinating attempt to bring the massive machinery of a Hollywood epic movie to bear upon a story set amidst the Malaya Emergency period. Based on the novel, The Durian Tree, by Michael Keon (a very colourful character himself), The 7th Dawn is a complex love triangle (with life and death stakes) between William Holden's rubber planter and former war-hero, Capucine, improbably cast Tetsuro Tamba as a communist guerrilla chief, modelled on Chin Peng. Shot and designed by the team who brought us Lawrence of Arabia two years before and directed by a pre-James Bond Lewis Gilbert, its credentials are impeccable, and yet it is an almost forgotten film today.


This screening is part of the 'Beyond Saint Jack' segment under the NUS Museum's Malaya Black & White film series.



About ‘Beyond Saint Jack’ - The strange cinematic visitors of Singapore and Malaya Singapore/Malaya’s heyday of foreign production from the mid 1960s to the early 1980s led to a motley filmography of B-movies, commercial disasters, miscellaneous TV episodes, lost films and bizarre curios. While they resist canonisation, these films are a fascinating portal into how the region was perceived by the rest of the world both before and after the end of the colonial era; and the eagerness for Singapore and Malaysia to be represented and acknowledged by the West. A recurring motif of their narratives is the Western visitor in Singapore. This season of 10 films showcases the predecessors and descendants of Saint Jack (1979): old hands, good men, legal aliens, rugged individualists, ex-soldiers, detectives, has-beens and rock stars. Characters who have found themselves ensnared in traps beyond their control, stumbled across exotic, bewildering cultures, or entered zones of erotic possibility.

Beyond Saint Jack is guest-curated by author and critic Ben Slater, who will be present to introduce and discuss each film.

About Ben Slater
Ben Slater is the author of Kinda Hot: The Making of Saint Jack in Singapore (2006), a major contributor to World Film Locations: Singapore (2014) and the editor of 25: Histories and Memories of the Singapore International Film Festival (2014). He’s also the co-screenwriter of the feature film Camera (2014) and a Lecturer at the School of Art, Media and Design, Nanyang Technological University.

Find out more about the Malaya Black & White project: malayablackandwhite.wordpress.com

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

About Michael Sullivan | NUS Museum's Anniversary Lecture by T.K. Sabapathy


Date: 30 April, Thursday 
Time: 7pm (Registration at 6.30pm) 
Venue: University Cultural Centre Theatre 
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** Event is strictly by registration only as limited seating is available **

This April 2015, the NUS Museum will mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the University of Malaya Art Museum, the predecessor institution of the NUS Museum. The occasion is marked by our Anniversary Lecture, About Michael Sullivan by T.K. Sabapathy on Thursday, 30 April, 7pm at the University Cultural Centre Theatre.

About Michael Sullivan
In 1954, Dr. Michael Sullivan was appointed as Lecturer in the History of Art at the University of Malaya. Consequently, he became also the founding curator of Singapore's first art museum and teaching collection - the University of Malaya Art Museum, located then at its campus at Bukit Timah. The study of history of art and displays of artefacts in a museum were envisaged as widening the scope of learning in a university in Singapore and the then Malaya. Today this collection forms the seed of the NUS Museum's South and Southeast Asian Collection.

Though trained primarily as a historian of Chinese art and with little formal education in museology or curating, Sullivan, in his short time here between 1954 and 1960, helped develop several important coordinates for the museum's developments. This lecture by T.K. Sabapathy, a former student of Sullivan, deals with the latter's tenure in the then University of Malaya from 1954-1960, his teaching of history of art, his research and writing on art in Southeast Asia and the establishment of the university art museum. In all these respects, Sullivan inaugurated the academic study of art and its histories in Singapore/Malaya. This illustrated lecture will feature both personal recollections and considerations of Sullivan as educator, curator and writer. It will be published later by the NUS Museum.

About the speaker
T.K. Sabapathy has been teaching courses in the history of art since 1966 in institutions in the United Kingdom, Malaysia and Singapore; he is currently an associate adjunct professor in the Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore. He was a student in Sullivan's class of 1958-1960, subsequently pursuing graduate studies in art history in the University of California, Berkeley, and in the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Sabapathy has researched into and published extensively on modern art and artists in Southeast Asia.

Event photos

30 April 2015, 7pm, University Cultural Centre Theatre
Posted by NUS Museum on Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Thursday, 9 April 2015

Exhibition Opening | Scholars & Ink: Artists from NUS and the Alumni

 
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Programme
6:30pm        Arrival of guests
7:00pm        Welcome address by Guest-of-Honour, Professor Tan Chorh Chuan (President, National University of Singapore)
7:20pm         Exhibition tour and refreshments

Scholars & Ink features artists from the extended community of the National University of Singapore, graduates and academics across faculties of the University. The title of the project plays on the association Chinese ink has long had with a literati culture in Chinese history. Scholars & Ink proposes ways of seeing modern and contemporary ink painting through the classical “Six Principles” and “Six Essentials” of Chinese ink paintings espoused by Xie He (479 – 502) and Jing Hao (c. 855 – 915) respectively. The diversity of artistic approaches, highlighted by their purposeful and varied references to ink conventions and contemporary strategies, is significant as an entry point into the longstanding ink tradition and its practice today, marked by simultaneous continuities and transformations.

The Singaporean artists featured in the exhibition include:
Dr Tan It Koon, BSc (1st Class Hons), PhD, MCB
Dr Ho Chee Lick (Snr Lecturer, Dept of Chinese Studies, NUS)
Yeo Shih Yun (BBA, 1988)
Hong Sek Chern (MA, SEA Studies)
Ling Yang Chang (BA (Econs), 1987)

The exhibition runs till August 2015.

Exhibition opening



Gallery impressions